Preserved Meyer Lemons Recipe with Exact Measurements

Preserved Meyer lemons are easy to make and delicious in many different food applications, from salads to soups. This recipe will explain how to make preserved Meyer lemons with exact measurements to assure the perfect preserved lemons!
Preserved Meyer Lemons

Preserved Meyer Lemon Recipe

Meyer lemon Cluster

Preserved lemons are a staple in Moroccan and sometime other African cuisines. They are preserved to use in tangines, soups and stews, to impart their mellow lemon flavor.

With an abundance of homegrown Meyer lemons, I set off during the holidays to preserve some for myself however, finding a recipe for preserved Meyer lemons with exact measurements proved to be difficult.

In my search, I found recipes that varied from 1 tablespoon sea salt per lemon, while others called for 1 teaspoon. One heirloom recipe was so vague, I was left wondering what the writer was thinking. The instruction said…just “toss in some salt!” I was frustrated with such a wide measurement variable, concerned the recipe would be either unsafe to consume, or so overly salted, it would be inedible. 

When trying to recreate a recipe for my readers food safety is paramount, especially where food preservation is concerned. I spent several weeks researching a variety of preserved lemon methods before trying my hand at the preserved Meyer lemons recipe. After some trial and error, I finally came up with exact measurements for preserving lemons in a safe way, and that also produce a tasty result. 

I made several batches using different varieties and measurements of sea salt(s) to test for flavor. I also made the addition of spices and hot chili’s to another batch that produced a delicious, spicy-tangy preserved lemon. The different varieties of sea salt didn’t make a difference in flavor however, the darker varieties altered the color of the fruit and juice.

The reward of preserving lemons is well worth the wait.

I’ve used my preserved Meyer lemons in a variety of delicious recipes over the past few months.

Warm Preserved Lemon Curry Macaroni Salad

Warm Macaroni Salad with Preserved lemon

 

Moroccan Chicken

Moroccan Chicken with Preserved Meyer Lemons and Kalamata Olives

How to Make Preserved Meyer Lemons
Preserved lemon recipe with exact measurements
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Ingredients
  1. 1 dozen Meyer lemons (or other variety)
  2. 12 tablespoons sea salt, divided
  3. 1/2 cup fresh squeezed or bottled lemon juice, if necessary
Instructions
  1. 1 quart canning jar(s) with rims and lids
  2. Wash lemons in cool water to remove dirt and impurities
  3. Sterilize jar in boiling water bath for 15 minutes before using.
  4. Slice both the stem and bottom end off lemons. Starting at one end, cut the lemons in half lengthwise, but stop about 1/2 an inch before you reach the bottom. Repeat the cut perpendicularly so you have cut each lemon lengthwise in a "X" formation, but not all the way through; they should still be attached at the bottom, about 1/2 an inch.
  5. If you are using several smaller jars, lemons can be fully quartered
  6. Gently open each lemon with fingers
  7. Spoon in 1/2 tablespoon (2 teaspoons) sea salt for each lemon
  8. Place three or four lemons in the jar and press with muddler to release juices. A wooden spoon can be used for this step
  9. Continue this process until all lemons are salted and juiced
  10. Be sure the fruit is totally covered with their juices. Add more fresh squeezed or bottled lemon juice if necessary
  11. Fill jar to the brim leaving about 1/4 inch head space and seal tightly
  12. Allow jar to rest at room temperature for 2 weeks before using
  13. Lemons will last for up to 1 year if kept in a cool place and can be stored in the refrigerated after resting at room temperature for 2 months.
To use
  1. Remove one or two lemons from the jar depending on what your recipe calls for.
  2. If the juice in the jar gets low, add enough bottled or fresh squeezed lemon juice to cover the fruit. Replace lid and return jar to resting place
  3. Rinse lemon in cool water and remove flesh. Some people use the flesh however, I don't care for the texture
  4. Once the peel is rinsed and flesh has been removed, slice or chop the the peel and use in salads, soups and stews. The peel can also be used in cocktails
Notes
  1. The flavor of preserved lemons enhances over time and can be embellished by adding spices and or hot peppers. I generally make one batch with just salt and another with a combinations of spices. Black peppercorns, whole clove, thai chili, coriander seeds etc.
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
Spices Preserved Lemon

Step 1 in making preserved Meyer lemons

Step 2 in making preserved Meyer lemons

Step 3 in making preserved Meyer lemons

Preserved Meyer lemons and spices

I would love to hear about your experiences making preserved lemons. Please feel free to share!




Mứt Tắc – Vietnamese Candied Kumquats

Candied Kumquats (Mứt Tắc), are commonly made during the Vietnamese Lunar New Year. These delicious treats lend their sweetness, bright happy color, and their flower shape to symbolize good luck and prosperity. 

Mứt Tắc , also known as Vietnamese Candied Kumquats

Parting from the New Year’s tradition, I decided to make this delightful candied kumquats recipe just a few weeks ago. The kumquat harvest in California was so bountiful this year, I put up 20 jars of kumquat jelly, and still had enough fruit to make the tiny morsels. Served with a hot cup of tea, kumquats are packed with a delicious sweet, citrus flavor, offering up a big dose of vitamin C in every bite.

The tart citrus flavor of kumquats also lends itself to more savory dishes, such as pork and duck, as well as their syrupy juice to flavor cocktails. Candied kumquats are delicious tossed into salads as a chewy, sweet bite. 

I’ve adapted the Mứt Tắc (Candied Kumquats) recipe from two sources, Spices of Life  and The Kitchn. Both recipes are time-consuming but The Kitchn uses fewer steps in their version. I’ve followed the pickling steps from Spices of Life, as I’m familiar with preserving with Mrs. Wages Pickling Lime, and it’s the more traditional method of preparation.

The result is well worth the effort, because candied kumquats are delicious! 

Vietnamese Candied Kumquats

Kumquat are native to South-Eastern China, but grown in many parts of the world. These varieties are most commonly grown for their fruit: Marumi kumquat, is known for its pleasant flavor and round. The Nagami kumquat (featured in this recipe) is more oval-shaped and the most common variety grown inside the United States. The Meiwa kumquat is round, and larger than the other varieties. Surprisingly, the skin is packed with sweetness, so eating the entire fruit is recommended. Mứt Tắc , also known as Vietnamese Candied Kumquats

Mứt Tắc (Candied Kumquats) 
Yields 8
Vietnamese Candied Kumquats
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Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
1 hr
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
1 hr
Ingredients
  1. 9 cups kumquats
  2. 3 cups sugar
  3. 1 tablespoon pickling lime (Mrs. Wages)
  4. 1/4 cup bottled lemon juice
  5. 12 cups water
  6. 1 teaspoon salt
Instructions
  1. In a large colander, rinse kumquats in cold water
  2. In another bowl combine 6 cups water with 1 tablespoon Mrs Wages Pickling Lime
  3. Place kumquats in a large pickle jug or bowl, pour pickling lime liquid over fruit and toss with a large spoon, cover and rest at room temperature for up to 4 hours or overnight
  4. Scoop whole fruit out from the pickling liquid into colander, and rinse in cold water
  5. Using a sharp pairing knife, slice 6-8 eyelets into the sides of kumquats making sure to leave the top and bottom of fruit intake.
  6. Remove as many seeds as possible by gently squeezing the cut fruit, a toothpick or sharp object is useful when trying to fish out the seeds however, don't' worry if you don't get all the seeds out, they will loosen up during the cooking process.
  7. Add salt to leftover pickling liquid, stir to combine
  8. Return cut fruit to the pickling liquid, add more water to cover fruit, cover with plastic wrap and rest overnight at room temperature
Finally
  1. Remove fruit from pickling liquid, and discard liquid, gently toss fruit under cold water and rinse for 3-5 minutes
  2. In a large stock pot combine sugar, bottled lemon juice and fruit, heat to medium high, stirring until sugar dissolves, bring to a boil, stirring occasionally
  3. Reduce heat to medium and cook until liquid is almost absorbed, takes 45 - 50 minutes.
  4. Remove individual fruit to a parchment lined cookie sheet, press the tops of the fruit with your finger until they resemble a flower shape, allow them to rest and air dry for up to 24 hours
  5. Keep fruit in canning jars or covered container for up to 3 months in the refrigerator
Notes
  1. Syrup can be pour over fruit and stored in jars to create a softer version.
Adapted from The Spices of Life
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
 

Kumquats

Kumquats in pickling lime

Vietnamese Candied Kumquats

Mứt Tắc , also known as Vietnamese Candied Kumquats

You might also like:

Cots and Quats

COTS n QUATS Marmalade with Madagascar Vanilla Bean and Morbier Cheese (Apricot and Kumquat Jam)

 

 

 




Kumquat Jelly Recipe – Canning Kumquats

Kumquat jelly is a delicious preserve with bright, tangy flavor from fresh kumquats!
Kumquat Jelly

This week’s kumquat bounty comes from my neighbor’s backyard and has me canning kumquat jelly. The tree was so full of fruit, I was able to pick 10 pounds of kumquats to make this rich, amber-colored jelly. I also made two more recipes: Kumquat Pepper Jelly, and Vietnamese candied kumquats, traditionally served at the Vietnamese Lunar New Year. 

What to expect when eating a kumquat:

The small fruit is super tart and very juicy, and sure to send your face into a pucker. Surprisingly, the skin is packed with sweetness, so eating the entire fruit is recommended. Simply, roll or squeeze the fruit gently before eating, to unify the flavors of the sweet thin rind with the tart flesh. 

Kumquats are native to South-Eastern China, but grown in many parts of the world. These varieties are most commonly grown for their fruit: Marumi kumquat, is known for its pleasant flavor and round. The Nagami kumquat (featured in this recipe) is more oval-shaped and the most common variety grown inside the United States. The Meiwa kumquat is round, and larger than the other varieties. 

Health Benefits of Kumquats:

  • Its peel is rich in many essential oils, antioxidants, and fiber. 100 g whole kumquats give 6.7 g or 17% of daily recommended levels of fiber that is composed of tannins, pectin, hemicellulose, and other non-starch polysaccharides (NSP).
  • Fresh kumquats are packed with many health benefiting poly-phenolic flavonoid anti-oxidants such as carotenes, lutein, zea-xanthin, tannins…etc. Kumquat peel composes many important essential oils, including limonene, pinene, a-bergamotene, caryophyllene, a-humulene, and a-muurolene. Together, these compounds impart special citrus aroma to the fruit.
  • Further, fresh fruits contain adequate levels of some of the anti-oxidant vitamins such as vitamin A, C and E. Altogether, these phytochemical compounds in kumquat fruit help scavenge harmful oxygen derived free radicals from the body and thereby protect us from cancers, diabetes, degenerative diseases and infections.
  • As in oranges, kumquats also very rich in vitamin C. 100 g fruit provides 47.9 or 73% of RDA (Recommended daily allowances). Vitamin-C is one of the powerful natural antioxidant which has many essential biological roles to play such as collagen synthesis and wound healing. This vitamin has antiviral and anti-cancer activities, and helps prevent neurodegenerative diseases, arthritis, diabetes…etc by removing oxidant free-radicals from the body. Furthermore, vitamin C facilitates iron absorption in the food.
  • Kumquat has good levels of B-complex group of vitamins such as thiamine, niacin, pyridoxine, folate, and pantothenic acid. These vitamins function as co-factors for metabolism of carbohydrates, protein, and fats. SOURCE: Nutrition and You

Enjoy this kumquat jelly recipe!

Kumquat Jelly
Yields 6
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Prep Time
20 min
Prep Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. 8 cups fresh kumquats cut in half
  2. 1/4 cup bottled lemon juice
  3. 4 cups water
  4. 3 packages liquid pectin
  5. 4 cups sugar
Instructions
  1. Wash kumquats with water, cut in half
  2. In a large stock pot, combine kumquats, sugar, lemon juice and water
  3. Over medium high heat, bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium, continue cooking for 1-2 hours stirring occasionally
  4. Place a fine sieve over a large bowl and strain liquid from solids, pressing fruit to extract as much liquid as possible
  5. Return liquid to stock pot and bring to a boil
  6. Add pectin and process 2 minutes at a full boil, turn off heat and skim foam
  7. Repeat this process twice more, processing 2 minutes then skimming foam both times
  8. Do a gel test by placing a small amount of jelly on a cold plate, wait about 1 minutes then draw your finger through the jelly, if the jelly keeps its shape it it ready to go. If the gel does not set, process at a full boil for an additional 2 minutes, skim foam and test again.
  9. Ladle hot liquid into sterilized jars leaving 1/4 inch head space, wipe rims with a clean damp cloth, place lids and rims on jars and process in a water bath for 10 minutes
  10. Allow jars to cool
Notes
  1. For detailed information about canning safty visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
 

Enjoy this tart-sweet kumquat jelly smeared over a toasted English muffin. Or if you like a more savory application, heat a jar in the microwave for 1 minute, stir and pour over a flaky piece of fresh halibut. Stay tuned for my kumquat pepper jelly and Vietnamese Candied kumquat recipes. 

California Kumquat Jelly




Persimmon Lemon Marmalade

Persimmon lemon marmalade is a creamy, tart condiment, perfect for spreading on toast and biscuits.
Persimmon lemon marmalade is a creamy, tart condiment, perfect for spreading onto toast and biscuits.

 

Mixing flavors to create a new and exciting recipes is what canning and cooking are all about for me. The flavor combination of lemon marmalade and persimmon butter was a huge success!

The creamy texture of persimmons and the and tartness of meyer lemons meld together to create a wow-za mouthful of flavors in this persimmon lemon marmalade recipe. 

Persimmon Meyer Lemon Marmalade
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Ingredients
  1. 4 cups peeled and chopped persimmons
  2. 3 cups Meyer Lemons
  3. 3 1/2 cups sugar
Instructions
  1. Clean the lemons and persimmons using cold water, rubbing gently with a clean cloth or soft food brush
  2. Cut the lemons in half and juice, reserve juice
  3. Using a very sharp knife, slice the lemons crosswise as thinly as possible to achieve a smoother, creamier marmalade. A time consuming effort but well worth the time, it really makes a big difference in the marmalade texture.
  4. Peel persimmons and discard peels, cut persimmons into chunks
  5. Add lemons to a large heavy bottom stock pot and cover them with cold water.
  6. Bring to a boil until the lemon peel is tender, about 10-15 minutes.
  7. Drain and rinse the peels thoroughly with cold water. Rinse out the pot too.
  8. Return lemons to the pot, add chopped persimmons and 1 1/2 cups water and bring to a boil
  9. Stir in 3 1/2 cups sugar
  10. Reduce heat to simmer. Cook until mixture is thick and creamy, about 1 hour
  11. Taste and add up to 1 1/2 cups sugar to taste.
  12. Stir in 1/2 cup reserved lemon juice
  13. (freeze or can remaining juice after removing pips)
  14. Remove marmalade from heat
  15. Pips will turn a dark brown during cooking, remove as many as possible before packing jars
  16. Pour hot marmalade into prepared jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace, using a butter knife, remove air bubbles by sliding the blade around the jar edges
  17. Wipe rims with clean towel and cover with lids and rims
  18. Process in a hot water bath for 15 minutes
Notes
  1. For detailed sterilization instructions visit this link: http://wp.me/p2MUuI-sr
  2. Disclaimer: When canning always follow the manufacturer's guidelines for jar sterilization and processing foods. See National Center for Home Food Preserving (http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/publications_usda.html)
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
More delicious homemade condiments:

Plum Jam

Rhubarb Kiwi Marmalade and Pineapple Mango Marmalade




San Francisco Flower and Garden Show…the Final Countdown #sfgardenshow2015

San Francisco Flower & Garden Show

 

We’re on the final countdown to my presentation at this years San Francisco Flower and Garden Show, “Making Heirloom Jams with Garden Petals.”

I’ll be sharing step-by-step instructions for canning rose petals into jelly and working with a variety of other garden petals. I will also share some fun facts regarding the distinct flavor profiles of rose petals base on color varietals as well as cooking with dried buds and blooms verses fresh picked petals. 

You can find me at the Kitchen Garden Stage, March 19, 2015 at 3PM. For more information about this years event visit the San Francisco Flower and Garden Show Facebook Page, or SF Garden Show. You won’t want to miss this one!! 

RosePetalJelly

 




Meyer Lemon Curd – Home Canning

Meyer lemon curd is a sweet-tart condiment that is incredibly easy to make. I’m going to show you how to make Meyer lemon curd, and how to preserve it with home canning.
Homemade Meyer Lemon Curd - home canning tutorital

My lemon tree is prolific this year, yielding over six bushels of stunning Meyer lemons, since December. I’m counting my blessings to live in a climate that’s conducive to growing citrus. These backyard beauties have kept me busy the past few months with a list of scrumptious recipes…lemon tart, habanero lemon jelly,  lemon icing, lemon cookies, canned lemon juice, lemon marmalade, and a whole slew of other lemon recipes. 

I’ve put off canning curd before due to food safety issues related to the recipe. The recipe calls for butter and in home canning, 98% of the time, that’s a no, no. Butter (fats and dairy) go rancid and develop bacteria if left in a jar unrefrigerated. Rest assured,  I researched the recipe at the National Center for Home Food Preservation to find this “Tested” recipe.

This Meyer lemon curd recipe is safe for food consumption not to mention, the flavor and creamy texture will knock you out! 

Despite assurances, I still keep my jars of canned Meyer lemon curd in the refrigerator. However, the stuff’s never around long enough to go bad. 

Meyer Lemon Curd
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
50 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
50 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 1/2 cups sugar (super fine), optional
  2. 1/2 cup lemon zest (freshly zested), optional
  3. 1 cup bottled lemon juice ( I used 1/2 cup fresh squeezed meyer lemon juice and 1/2 cup bottled, make at your own risk and be sure to refrigerate after canning)
  4. 3/4 cup unsalted butter. chilled, cut into approximately 3/4 " pieces
  5. 7 large egg yolks
  6. 4 large whole eggs
Instructions
  1. Wash jars, rims and lids according to manufacturer's instructions. Sterilize clean jars in a large stock pot or professional water canner. Place jars in pot and and cover with water, boil jars for 15 minutes. Leave in pot over medium heat until ready to use.
  2. Heat a separate water canner with enough water to cover filled jars by 1 -2 inches. Heat water to 180 degrees F. by the time jars are ready to be added for processing. Use food thermometer to monitor heat.
CAUTION: THIS IS A VERY IMPORTANT STEP WHEN CANNING LEMON CURD
  1. Do not heat the water in the canner to more than 180 degrees F. before jars are added. If the water in the canner is too hot when the jars are added, the process time will not be long enough. The time it takes for the canner to reach boiling after the jars are added in expected to be 25-30 minutes for processing lemon curd. Process time starts after the water in the canner comes to a full boil over the tops of the filled jars.
  2. If using lemon zest: Combine lemon zest and sugar and set aside for about 30 minutes to allow flavors to meld
  3. Heat water in the bottom of a double boiler until a gentle boil. The water should not boil vigorously or touch the bottom of the top of the double boiler pan in which the lemon curd is to be cooked. Hot steam is sufficient for the cooking process to occur.
  4. In the top of the double boiler, on the counter away from the heat, whisk egg yolks and whole eggs together until thoroughly mixed. Slowly whisk in the sugar and zest, blending until smooth. Blend in the lemon juice and then add the butter pieces to the mixture.
  5. Place the top of the double boiler over boiling water in the bottom of the pan. Stir gently but continuously with a silicone spatula or cooking spoon, to prevent mixture from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Continue cooking until the mixture reaches 170 degrees F. Use food thermometer to monitor heat
  6. Remove double boiler pan from heat and place on a heat protected surface. Continue to gently stir until curd thickens (about 5 minutes). Strain curd through a mess strainer into a clean stainless steel or glass bow; discard zest
  7. Fill hot curd into cleaned half-pint jars, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a clean damp cloth or paper towel; apply two-piece metal canning lids.
  8. Place filled jars into 180 degree water bath, be sure water is over the tops of jars, when water has come to a full rolling boil, process jars for 15 minutes.
  9. Remove jars from canner and allow to cool on a dry kitchen towel, store in a cool dry place for up to 3 months
Notes
  1. For best quality, use lemon curd within 3-4 months. Discoloration may occur over time, discard contents anytime visual changes occur.
  2. Processed curd can be frozen for up to 1 year without quality changes when thawed.
  3. Yields: 3-4 half-pint jars
Adapted from National Center for Home Food Preservation
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
 

Meyer Lemon Curd

If you enjoy the Meyer lemon curd, you might also like Paleo Lemon Curd. To see the recipe click the photo.

 Paleo Lemon Curd




Meyer Lemon Habanero Pepper Jelly

Meyer Lemon Habanero Pepper Jelly…Quite possibly the best jelly I’ve ever had!! Super spicy, and sweet with a crisp lemon finish; a simply exquisite jelly! Let me know how you like it!! Serve with creamy sheep and goat milk, La Tur cheese and crisp thin crackers. 

Meyer Lemon Habanero Pepper Jelly

Canning with Lemon Juice 101:

Even when canning high acid foods like Meyer lemons, it’s essential to use bottled lemon juice. The reason for this is that, bottled lemon (lime) juice has been uniformly acidified. Uniform acidity is crucial when canning in a water bath. 

Canning vegetables and meats require pressure canning to ensure food safety. You’ll find that most of my canning recipes are processed in a water bath as opposed to pressure canning because I am a seasonal canner. For the most part, I preserve recipes that are made with high acid foods such as,  jams, jellies, marmalade and salsa containing fruits naturally high in citric acid, as well as pickles, that utilize uniformly acidified vinegar for preservation.  

I aim to bring you recipes that are not only tasty, but safe for consumption, so I follow USDA guidelines to the letter. The use of uniformly acidified lemon juice is also recommended by the National Center for Home Preservation

Ensuring safe canned foods Growth of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum in canned food may cause botulism—a deadly form of food poisoning. These bacteria exist either as spores or as vegetative cells. The spores, which are comparable to plant seeds, can survive harmlessly in soil and water for many years. When ideal conditions exist for growth, the spores produce vegetative cells which multiply rapidly and may produce a deadly toxin within 3 to 4 days of growth in an environment consisting of: • a moist, low-acid food • a temperature between 40° and 120°F • less than 2 percent oxygen. Botulinum spores are on most fresh food surfaces. Because they grow only in the absence of air, they are harmless on fresh foods. Most bacteria, yeasts, and molds are difficult to remove from food surfaces. Washing fresh food reduces their numbers only slightly. Peeling root crops, underground stem crops, and tomatoes reduces their numbers greatly. Blanching also helps, but the vital controls are the method of canning and making sure the recommended research-based process times, found in these guides, are used. The processing times in these guides ensure destruction of the largest expected number of heat-resistant microorganisms in home-canned foods. Properly sterilized canned food will be free of spoilage if lids seal and jars are stored below 95°F. Storing jars at 50° to 70°F enhances retention of quality. SOURCE: USDA.

 

Enjoy this Meyer lemon habanero pepper jelly recipe!

Meyer Lemon Habanero Pepper Jelly
Yields 12
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
45 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
45 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 cups fresh Meyer lemon juice
  2. 1 cup bottled lemon juice
  3. 2 cups water
  4. 4 packages liquid pectin
  5. 7 cups sugar
  6. 3 large habanero peppers
  7. 10-12 whole Thai chilies
Instructions
  1. Wash lemons, habanero and Thai peppers, pat dry
  2. Juice lemons and strain through a fine sieve to remove pips
  3. Refrigerate peels in a large plastic zip bag to make Meyer Lemon Marmalade and reserve any extra lemon juice for later use. (http://wp.me/p2MUuI-1FS)
  4. In a large heavy bottom stock pot heat 2 cups fresh lemon juice, water, and sugar over medium high heat until sugar is dissolved.
  5. Cut habanero peppers in half and add to hot liquid
  6. Bring liquid to a boil, reduce heat to medium and cook for 30 minutes
  7. Remove habanero peppers and discard
  8. Add 1 cup bottled lemon juice and stir, bring to a boil, add 4 packages liquid pectin, stir and bring back to a boil
  9. Boil for 2 minutes, take a gel test by placing a small amount of jelly into a iced tablespoon
  10. If jelly does not set boil for additional 2 minutes and test again
  11. Pour hot jelly into sterilized jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace
  12. add 1-2 whole Thai chilies in each jar. Wipe rims with clean towel and cover with lids and rims
  13. Process in a hot water bath for 15 minutes
  14. Remove jars from water bath and rest on clean towels until cool enough to handle, store in a cool dry place
Notes
  1. Spead over cream cheese and eat with crackers or crusty bread
Adapted from Household Searchlight-1941 Edition
Adapted from Household Searchlight-1941 Edition
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
Meyer Lemon Habanero Pepper Jelly...Quite possibly the best jelly I've ever had!! Super spicy, and sweet with a crisp lemon finish; a simply exquisite jelly!
Chalk Board canning jar labels source: handcraftyourlife

Canning Jar Labels: Etsy Shop CanningCrafts
Meyer Lemon Habanero Pepper Jelly

If you like the Meyer lemon habanero jelly recipe, here are more home canning recipes to try:

Lemon Marmalade-Canning for Christmas

Kumquat Jelly Recipe – Canning Kumquats




Persimmon Butter – Home Canning

Persimmon butter is a delicious condiment, especially when spread onto toast, bagels, or English muffins. This is an easy home canning recipe.
Fresh persimmon, for making persimmon butter

Persimmons are a stunning fruit visually and viscerally. Mildly tart, their flavor is reminiscent of sweet papaya, but with a firmer texture. They are the perfect flavor and consistency for making persimmon butter!

Enjoy persimmon butter on your morning muffin, crumpets, toast, or my new personal favorite, French crepes.

Persimmons (UK /pəˈsɪmən/ or US /pərˈsɪmən/) are the edible fruit of a number of species of trees in the genus Diospyros. Diospyros is in the family Ebenaceae. The most widely cultivated species is the Asian persimmon, Diospyros kaki. In color the ripe fruit of the cultivated strains range from light yellow-orange to dark red-orange depending on the species and variety. They similarly vary in size from 1.5 to 9 cm (0.5 to 4 in) in diameter, and in shape the varieties may be spherical, acorn-, or pumpkin-shaped.[1] The calyx generally remains attached to the fruit after harvesting, but becomes easy to remove once the fruit is ripe. The ripe fruit has a high glucose content. The protein content is low, but it has a balanced protein profile. Persimmon fruits have been put to various medicinal and chemical uses.

Like the tomato, persimmons are not popularly considered to be berries, but in terms of botanical morphology the fruit is in fact a berry. SOURCE: WIKIPEDIA

I like to serve the persimmon butter warm, over French crepes or pancakes. I hope you will enjoy it, too.

Disclaimer: Persimmons have a mid range PH level which is right on the cusp of safety standards for water bath canning. This recipe is tested “safe” if canned with other higher acidic fruit such as pears, lemons etc. I follow tested water bath canning methods for this recipe but store the sealed, small batch jars in the refrigerator for up to one month.

 

Crepe w persimmon butter

French Crepes with Persimmon Butter

Persimmon Butter
Yields 4
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
45 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
45 min
Ingredients
  1. 20 peeled and cubed persimmons, about 6 cups chopped fruit
  2. 1/2 cup bottled lemon juice
  3. 1 cup water
  4. Sugar to taste, optional
  5. 1 Cinnamon stick, optional
Instructions
  1. Peel, hull and cube persimmons
  2. In a large heavy bottom stock pot, combine fruit, 1 cup water, and 1/4 cup of lemon juice
  3. Cook over medium heat allowing fruit to soften and release juices, about 30 minutes
  4. Add remaining lemon juice and taste for sweetness, add sugar to taste if necessary
  5. Bring to a boil and cook for 2 minutes stirring constantly to keep the bottom of the pan from burning
  6. Remove from heat
  7. With a potato masher or using an immersion blender, blend until consistency is smooth like Butter, it should resemble thick applesauce.
  8. Pur hot butter into sterilized jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace,
  9. Remove air bubbles by running a thin knife around the side of the jar, wipe rims with a damp clean towel to remove any food residue, top with clean lids and screw on rims
  10. Transfer to large water bath with enough water to cover jars, bring water to a boil, begin processing time at the boil, and process for 15 minutes
Notes
  1. Cinnamon and sugar can be added to flavor the butter however, persimmons have such a sweet and delicate flavor, I usually don't add them.
  2. CANNING SAFTEY: Persimmon has a pH value right on the cusp of being unsafe for water bath canning, I suggest combining persimmons with another more acidic fruit and always use bottled lemon juice. I follow tested water bath canning methods for this recipe but store the sealed, small batches in the refrigerator for up to one month.
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
Sliced Persimmons 

Click HERE Crepes with Persimmon Butter




I’m Speaking at the San Francisco Flower and Garden Show – Making Heirloom Jams with Garden Petals

San Francisco Flower & Garden Show

I just received some fantastic news! I’ve been chosen to speak at the San Francisco Flower and Garden Show Thursday, March 19 – 3:00 PM .

I’ll be sharing 45 minutes of canning instruction, Making Heirloom Jams with Garden Petals, demoing my Rose Petal Jelly recipe, at the Kitchen Garden Stage.

Thanks, Jen Long at the Garden Tribe, for giving me the opportunity to share my knowledge of canning garden petals at this years event.  

TALK DETAILS

Join Rebecka Evans as she presents step-by-step instructions for canning rose petals into jelly and working with a variety of other garden petals. Rebecka will share her knowledge regarding the distinct flavor profiles of rose petals base on color varietals as well as cooking with dried buds and blooms versus fresh picked petals. She’ll also share general information about jar sterilization, and water bath canning versus pressure canning.

For more information about the 2015 Flower and Garden Show visit sfgardenshow.com. You can also find useful information and updates on the Garden Tribes FB page.

If you live in the SF area and are planning to attend the show, I’d be honored to meet you. Please stop by after my show and say hello! Stay tuned for more updates as the event draws closer! 




Lemon Marmalade – Canning for Christmas

Lemon marmalade is a homemade condiment with sweet-tart flavor. This easy marmalade recipe makes great holiday food gifts!
Lemon marmalade is a homemade condiment with sweet-tart flavor. This easy marmalade recipe makes great holiday food gifts!

Each year I put up one of my favorite jams or jellies to give away as family/hostess gifts during the holiday season. This Christmas, I decided to make lemon marmalade. I grow a healthy, and heavy producing lemon tree in my backyard. Our lemon tree bore four bushels of juicy, plump lemons and still has dozens hanging on the tree, awaiting their transformation into lemon curd!

Lemon marmalade’s sweet-tart flavor goes remarkably well with any Christmas sideboard; served as a tart accompaniment to your holiday meal, or slathered over buttery toast, smeared with cream cheese, as a decadent Christmas morning snack. Anyway you serve it, the flavors are sure to please your friends and family. 

 

Dark Rye with Lemon Marmalade and Cream Cheese

The key to a creamy lemon marmalade is how you slice the peels; the thinner the better!

The thin slices cook down to a silky consistency, creating the most noble marmalade. 

Making Lemon Marmalade

I hope you enjoy this lemon marmalade recipe!

Lemon Marmalade-Canning for Christmas
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Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
1 hr 30 min
Total Time
2 hr
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
1 hr 30 min
Total Time
2 hr
Ingredients
  1. 5 pounds fresh lemons, any variety
  2. 3 1/2 - 5 cups sugar
  3. 8 - 9 half-pint jars and sealing lids and rims, or 4 pint jars with lids and rims
Instructions
  1. Clean the lemons using cold water, rubbing gently with a clean cloth or soft food brush
  2. Cut the lemons in half and juice, reserve juice
  3. Using a very sharp knife, slice the lemons crosswise as thinly as possible to achieve a smoother, creamier marmalade. A time consuming effort but well worth the time, it really makes a big difference in the marmalade texture.
  4. Put lemons in a large heavy bottom stock pot and cover them with cold water.
  5. Bring to a boil until the peel is tender, about 10-15 minutes.
  6. Drain and rinse the peels thoroughly with cold water. Rinse out the pot too.
  7. Return lemons to the pot with 1 1/2 cups water and bring to a boil
  8. Stir in 3 1/2 cups sugar
  9. Reduce heat to simmer. Cook until mixture is thick and creamy, about 1 hour
  10. Taste and add up to 1 1/2 cups sugar to taste.
  11. Stir in 1/2 cup reserved lemon juice
  12. (freeze or can remaining juice after removing pips)
  13. Remove marmalade from heat
  14. Pips will turn a dark brown during cooking, remove as many as possible before packing jars
  15. Pour hot marmalade into prepared jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace (http://wp.me/p2MUuI-sr)
  16. Wipe rims and cover with lids and rims
  17. Process in a hot water bath for 15 minutes
Notes
  1. This recipe can also be used to make orange marmalade
  2. For detailed sterilization instructions visit this link: http://wp.me/p2MUuI-sr
  3. Disclaimer: When canning always follow the manufacturer's guidelines for jar sterilization and processing foods. See National Center for Home Food Preserving (http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/publications_usda.html)
Adapted from about food Molly Watson
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
 Merry Christmas to all my loyal At Home with Rebecka friends, and my sweet family! May your days be filled with joy and God’s blessing!

steeping lemon peels to make lemon marmalade

 

More marmalade and jelly recipes to try:

Persimmon Lemon Marmalade

Rhubarb Kiwi Marmalade and Pineapple Mango Marmalade

Mandarin Marmalade




Canning Fig Preserves with 80 Proof Spirits

Fig preserves, made with Kimi figs and ROOT 80 proof spirits, may be the best preserves I’ve ever had!
Canning Fig Preserves

Blessed with neighbors that have an abundance of fruit trees, I had the pleasure of canning fig preserves today.

There are four types of cultivated figs: Kalamata, Totato, Mission and Kimi. The figs growing in my neighbor’s yard and used in my recipe, are the Kimi variety. Kimi figs are believed to be the tastiest figs in the world. Super sweet and tender, the fruit is actually an inside out flower, where in the wild forms, pollinators have to go inside the fruit to taste the sweet nectar. Wasps enter the fruit via cracks to reproduce.

Thankfully, I haven’t found or eaten a fig inhabited by a wasp family. One of my other favorite figs is the Totato however, you must wait until just the right time to eat the fruit to get the full benefit of their sweet, honey flavor. 

To liven up my fig preserves recipe, I added a little booze to the mix; ROOT 80 Proof Spirits. The herbed spirit adds the essence of its spices to the fig preserves, without compromising the fig flavor.

ROOT, is a historical distilled blend of birch bark, wintergreen and other wild roots and herbs; introduced to British settlers, by American Indians in the 1700’s. Root Beer origins come from the distilled beverage, when in the 1900’s the alcohol was removed by a Philadelphian pharmacist. He introduced Root Beer at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition, the rest is history. 

Fig Preserves with Root 80 Proof Spirits

 Making and Canning Fig Preserves

Cooked Fig Preserves

Fig Preserves with ROOT 80 Proof Spirits
A boozy fig preserve, smooth and packed with flavor
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
35 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
35 min
Ingredients
  1. 8 cups fresh figs
  2. 3 cups water
  3. 1 tablespoon baking soda
  4. 1 1/2 cups sugar
  5. Zest 1 lemon
  6. 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  7. 1/2 cup ROOT 80 Proof Spirits (optional)
Instructions
  1. Put figs in a large bowl, mix 2 cups water with baking soda in a large measuring cup
  2. Pour soda water mixture over figs, press figs into water to remove debris then rinse with cold water
  3. Cut figs into small pieces
  4. In a large stockpot add figs, sugar, lemon zest, lemon juice, and 1 cup remaining water
  5. Cook over medium high heat for 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally
  6. Remove pot from heat, puree mixture with an immersion blender until smooth
  7. Return to heat, bring to a boil and cook for 10 minutes
  8. Remove pot from heat and process hot mixture again with immersion blender until thick and creamy (resembles very thick applesauce)
  9. Add 1/2 cup ROOT 80 Proof Spirits, stir to blend
  10. Return to heat and cook additional 10 minutes, stirring constantly
  11. Ladle hot preserves into sterilized jars, cover jars with cleaned lids and rims, process in a hot water bath for 15 minutes
  12. Allow preserves to cool, store in a dry dark place
Notes
  1. For canning sterilization and jar preparation instructions: http://wp.me/p2MUuI-sr
  2. All content on this blog are the author’s personal views and opinions. The information provided is solely for entertainment and does not constitute any legal, medical, or other professional advice. It is not to be taken as fact nor absolute truth and it is not the author’s intention to do harm or to injure others. The author will not be held responsible for advice, tips, techniques, and recommendations used. Readers of this blog are to use it at their own free will and at their own risk.I can strictly using the traditional methods that have been done for decades.
  3. My desire is to preserve safe, healthy, tasty food for my readers and loved ones, however you may want to research USDA guidelines prior to using the older methods found here. I am not affiliated with the USDA, any of the state Cooperative Extension Services, or any of the manufacturers of canning supplies and equipment. I am not a Certified Master preserver but have learned from traditions passed down for hundreds of years.
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
Fig Preserves with 80 proof spirits Want to make some more preserves?

 




Spicy-Sweet Pickled Peppers

Spicy-sweet pickled peppers are easy to make, and are perfect in sandwiches or just for snacking.
spicy-sweet pickled peppers

Canning spicy pickled peppers is a sure sign that it’s pepper season. One of my family’s favorite condiments, I plate them with hamburgers and hotdogs as an alternative to dill or sweet pickles. I like a little more kick when it comes to eating pickles, so I add at least one Habanero pepper to each jar.

Pickled peppers make a delicious spicy-sweet snack when served with cheese and crackers but they are best served on my Philly cheese steak sandwiches! Just wait until I post the recipe, you’re going to love it!

I like the freedom that canning brings to recipes. I’m able to adjust the sugar level and add spices I enjoy. Nasty preservatives are never an issue; vinegar is the only preservative in the recipe.

Easy to make, very little mess, and there’s no need to process the pickles unless you’re putting them up for more than a month. They stay crisp and fresh for up to three months when refrigerated. 

Spicy-Sweet Pickled Peppers
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
20 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. Yields 2 quarts
  2. 1 pound assorted chiles (poblano, hatch green, red and green bell peppers, jalapenos, habanero, etc.) about two or three of each variety
  3. 1/2 cup sugar
  4. 1 1/2 cups water
  5. 3/4 cup distilled vinegar
  6. 3 large garlic cloves
  7. big pinch of sea salt
  8. 1 tablespoon whole coriander seeds
  9. 1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns
  10. 6 bay leaves
Instructions
  1. Wash and sterilize canning jars to the manufacturer specification, keep them on the stove in hot water until ready to use
  2. In a heavy bottom stock pot combine sugar, vinegar and water
  3. Bring to a boil, stirring until sugar is dissolved
  4. Add salt, coriander, bay leaves and peppercorns, and bring back to a boil, reduce heat to medium and cook pickling liquid for 10 minutes
  5. Wash and towel dry the peppers
  6. Slice peppers lengthwise to resemble strips, remove white membrane and seeds (seed removal is optional, if you like a hotter mix, leave them in)
  7. If peppers are too long, cut tops leaving 1/4 inch headspace
  8. Peel and slice garlic lengthwise
  9. Place pepper strips in hot jars lengthwise, alternating varieties so that each jar contains some of each pepper
  10. Add garlic strips evenly (2 or 3 per jar)
  11. Ladle hot pickling liquid over pepper mixture leaving 1/4 inch head space
  12. Cover with lids and rims
  13. Process in a hot water bath for 5 minutes or refrigerate jars up to 3 months
Notes
  1. For detailed jar prep and sterilization click the link: http://wp.me/p2MUuI-sr
  2. Disclaimer: http://athomewithrebecka.com/home/home-canning-information-and-disclaimer/
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
 

 

Pickled Peppers

 

Canned Pickled Peppers

More delicious canning recipes to try:

Meyer Lemon Curd

Plum Jam

Meyer Lemon Habanero Pepper Jelly

 




Canning Plum Jam

Canning plum jam is easy, fun, and of course, leads to delicious plum recipes! Learning to can fresh plums will give you the opportunity to enjoy them all year long!
Canning Plum Jam The trick to making and canning exquisite jams and jellies is using quality produce; organically grown and vine ripened to be exact. A difficult task these days, given the drought in California and across the country. Plums have been plentiful at the farmers market and local grocers but high cost of watering has effectively pushed prices upwards of $4.99 a pound.

I paid $6.00 for 2 plums last week. They were delicious, but it was difficult to swallow the cost.  Thankfully, I had some luck procuring the plums for canning this batch of plum jam; the only price for the fruit was a bit of embarrassment. My neighbors fruit trees line the open space between the street and their fence, offering up a heap of temptation for my gathering spirit.

With no, “do not trespass or private property” signs visibly displayed, I grew eager to see the fruit made into jam.  No pesticides, and so ripe were the plums, they fell to the pavement below by the dozen. I could barely contain myself watching the damaged fruit fall from the tree and scatter about, only to be run over by passing cars or eaten by the neighborhood squirrels and crows.

The urge to start canning plum jam was more than I could bear.

As courtesy dictates, I tried to contact the neighbor before helping myself to the harvest. Unfortunately, they were never home. After about of week of unsuccessful attempts to meet my neighbor, I finally mustered up the courage to gather only the fallen fruit, hoping the property owner wouldn’t mind the intrusion.  Of course, the moment I began picking broken fruit from beneath the tree, the owner and his daughter came out of the house. Damn, caught in the act! Fresh Plums for Jam  I’m sure I blushed ten shades of red, while I muttered on about my attempts to ask first to no avail. I went right on to say that, “I’m only taking the damaged fruit, I hope you don’t mind?”.  Thankfully, the owners daughter Sarah, was gracious enough to help me pick a few dozen plums from the tree after I promised a few jars of plum jam in return.

Caught up in conversation, Sarah shared her plans to become a doctor and attend school in Denver, CO (my hometown). We discussed canning and food blogging, and my hopes of finding enough rose petals to make rose petal jelly. We became fast friends! Despite the thirty year gap in age, we talked on like we’d been friends for years. I went home with a 5 pound basket of fresh picked plums and made a new friend in the process. The next morning Sarah rang my doorbell, she asked, “Will you teach me how to can plum jam?” My answer was, yes – canning plum jam is so delightful!

What an honor and privilege to teach a young woman how to can fruit, especially such an eager student. Canning plum jam that day was a success, and after her first taste of rose petal jelly, Sarah began gathering the giant English roses from her yard for our next project!  We spent several hours canning jams and jellies over the next few weeks. Thank you Sarah, for being such a great student and hanging out with this old cook!  

Canning plum jam is something I hope you will enjoy as well! Here are the directions on how to make plum jam.

Plum Jam
Yields 8
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Prep Time
15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 quarts plums (about 8 cups or four pounds), pits discarded
  2. 5 cups granulated sugar
  3. 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  4. 1/2 cups water
  5. 1 packages liquid pectin
Instructions
  1. Prepare sterilized jars to manufacture specification, keep water and jars on stove over medium heat.
  2. Wash plums in cold water
  3. Remove pits
  4. Leave skin on
  5. Cut plums into fourths
  6. Add plums, lemon juice and water to a large stock pot, cook over medium high heat until boiling
  7. Strain mixture through a rough sieve to remove skins (optional)
  8. Return liquid to stock pot, add sugar, stirring constantly, bring back to a rolling boil (a boil that stirring cannot break)
  9. Add pectin, stirring constantly, bring back to a boil and cook for 1 minute
  10. Let rest 1 minute and skim foam using a spoon or spatula
  11. Test jell point: In a medium bowl pour ice cubes then add ice water leaving an inch head space
  12. Rest a metal measuring cup on the top of the cold water
  13. Place a tablespoon hot liquid in cold measuring cup, wait about a minute and test the jell, if the jell is to soft, return mixture to the stove and cook additional 1 minute
  14. Ladle hot liquid into sterilized jars, clean rims with a damp cloth, place lids and rims on jars and place in a hot water bath for 5 minutes. Remove jars from hot water, label, and store in a dry place
Notes
  1. For detailed jar sterilization and canning prep: http://athomewithrebecka.com/what-you-will-need-jar-preparation/
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
  Plum Jam - Canning plum jam is easy, fun, and leads to delicious plum recipes! Learning to can fresh plums will give you the opportunity to enjoy them all year long!




Homemade Grape Jelly

Homemade grape jelly is better than anything you can buy in a grocery store! This homemade grape jelly recipe is easy to make, and will be the star of your canning pantry!

Homemade grape jelly is better than anything you can buy in a grocery store! This homemade grape jelly recipe is easy to make, and will be the star of your canning pantry!

Despite that California grows grapes by the ton, we still pay a hefty price for the little buggers. My local grocery has them on sale this week for $2.99 per pound. I generally buy 1-2 pounds which roughly costs about $6.00, and that’s the sale price! Six dollars worth of grapes may not seem like too much to spend however, what do you do when you get home, taste a few to find they are just too sour to eat? Mildly frustrating for me, to say the least.

To reduce the problem of purchasing sour grapes, I used to taste test a grape before bagging however, I stopped taste testing after hearing that several people have been arrested, and charged with fourth degree theft for doing so. I understand why companies have taken up the policy, but still feel ripped off when I get home with a nasty batch of sour grapes. Some grocers allow sampling, so I’m always sure to ask one of the staff for a taste before buying. Most times, they are happy to oblige. Of course, you can also use this handy guide to tell you if grapes are ripe and edible

The question is, what to do with the sour grapes your family won’t eat? One option: return them to the store for money back guarantee. Sadly, I usually shove the bag into the crisper drawer and forget they’re in there until they become shriveled up raisins or worse, molded raisins. They eventually get tossed into the recycle bin and I walk away filled with buyer’s remorse. I hate waste!

Of course, the best thing to do with fresh grapes is to make homemade grape jelly, duh!

I’ve canned jams and jellies my entire life, why didn’t I think of this earlier? All I had to do was toss the grapes into a stock pot add water and cook for about 30 minutes, strain through a fine sieve and then add some sugar and pectin. That’s it!

Sometimes, I can’t help but wonder where my brain is!

Homemade grape jelly is delicious, has no preservatives and you can adjust the amount of sugar to your liking.

Homemade Grape Jelly
Yields 6
Using store bought grapes to make fresh grape jelly is easy and delicious.
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Total Time
45 min
Total Time
45 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 pounds grapes
  2. enough water to cover grapes, about 4 cups
  3. 2 cups sugar
  4. juice of 1 lemon
  5. 1 package liquid pectin
Instructions
  1. Wash and remove grapes from the stem
  2. Place grapes in a medium stock pot, pour enough cold water to cover the grapes
  3. Bring to a boil over medium high heat, reduce heat after the boil is reached and let simmer for 30 minutes
  4. Using a potato masher or wooden spoon, smash and pop the grapes, strain through a fine sieve. (another method would be to use an immersion blender to achieve the consistency of jam).
  5. Measure liquid, add enough water to equal 6 cups, return liquid to stock pot
  6. Bring back to a boil, reduce heat to medium
  7. Add 2 cups sugar, and lemon juice. Taste for sweetness, add more sugar if necessary
  8. Stir until sugar is liquified
  9. Bring back to a boil (this won't take long so keep an eye on the pot)
  10. Add liquid pectin and boil for 1 minute, remove from heat. For thicker jelly, boil additional 2 minutes.
  11. Place hot liquid in sterilized jars and process in a hot water bath for 5 minutes.
  12. Grape jelly can also be kept in the refrigerator, in an airtight container for up to 3 months
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
Homemade Grape Jelly




Rose Petal Jelly Recipe

The flavors of rose petal jelly are intoxicating and exotic; beautifully light and sweet, with the heady fragrance of a bouquet of fresh-cut roses. Perfect for a romantic morning breakfast or brunch.
Rose petal Jelly1

You’ve never known true culinary perfection until you have tasted rose petal jelly. Smeared over a yeasty piece of buttered bread or coupled with Devonshire cream, rose petal jelly is enough to make me swoon! A treasured recipe, passed to me from my mother; I’ve come to refer to as, the sweet taste of summer, captured in a jar! 

I can remember watching my mother gather roses from the garden, intent on repurposing the delicate petals into the most delightful, edible treat. Something magical happened when the roses filled our house with their scent; an unspeakable calm came over me and my mind filled with fanciful daydreams of fairies.  I love how smells evoke emotions long subdued by time, and wired so deeply into my brain, just one whiff and I’m back in my mother’s kitchen; a food memory that will last a lifetime. 

Rose petal jelly, jam and syrup have been used in the culinary arts for decades, and although the recipes come from around the globe, they stay very similar.

  • Venice, Italy, Monks from the San Lazzaro degli Armeni Monastery, bottle 5000 jars of rose petal jam each year to be sold in the Monastery store
  • Persian cooks have crafted rose petal jam since the early 1600’s using the elegant Damascus rose
  • Ukrainian cooks, preserve rose petal jam by smashing or processing the petals with sugar and lemon juice creating a paste that is traditionally used to fill donuts
  • Served at High Tea, I’ve found English recipes dating back as early as the 1700’s.  

When making rose petal jelly, it’s best to pick organic roses, and the most flavorful jelly comes from the most fragrant blooms. Choose roses that are at their height of bloom, and if possible, gather at night when the scent is most powerful; keep fresh in the refrigerator overnight, tucked away in a plastic zip bag.

I hope you enjoy making this rose petal jelly recipe! 

Serve on toasted homemade bread, scones, or an English muffin.

The flavors of rose petal jelly are intoxicating and exotic; beautifully light and sweet, with the heady fragrance of a bouquet of fresh-cut roses. Perfect for a romantic morning breakfast or brunch.

 

Rose Petal Jelly
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
45 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
45 min
Ingredients
  1. 4 cups pink or red edible roses
  2. 3 cups sugar
  3. 3 1/3 cups water
  4. 1/4 cup fresh or prepared lemon juice
  5. 1 tablespoon Rose Water (can be found in Eastern Indian markets)
  6. 2 packages liquid pectin
  7. All edible flowers must be free of pesticides. Do not eat flowers from florists, nurseries, or garden centers. In many cases they are treated with pesticides not labeled for food crops
Instructions
  1. Clip and discard the bitter white base from petals
  2. Rinse in cold water to remove debris and small bugs, drain
  3. In a large bowl combine rose petals with 1/2 cup raw or organic sugar, using your hands, bruise petals, take care that all the petals are coated evenly, cover and refrigerate overnight
  4. In a large saucepan over medium heat, add remaining sugar, water and lemon juice; stirring until dissolved
  5. Stir in rose petals and cook at a low boil for 20 minutes or until candy thermometer reaches 110 degrees C. or 220 degrees F.
  6. Strain liquid through a fine sieve, pressing all the liquid from the petals (do not strain rose flesh of making jam unless the petals are discolored)
  7. Measure rose liquid, you should have 4 cups. Add enough water to equal 4 cups if necessary
  8. Return liquid to saucepan, bring back to a boil
  9. Cook until liquid reaches 110 degrees C. or 220 degrees F.
  10. Add liquid pectin, stirring constantly, boil for 2 minutes.
  11. Pour a small amount of jelly onto a chilled plate, if liquid holds its shape pour into sterilized jars, if it's still runny, process additional 2-3 minutes.
  12. Add rose water, remove from heat
  13. Pour jelly into prepared sterilized jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace
  14. Jelly can be stored in the refrigerator for up to six months
  15. To preserve for storage at room temperature, cover jars with lids and rims, place in a hot water bath (2 -3 inches boiling water) for 15 minutes at a hard boil
Notes
  1. Serve with crusty yeast bread, flat breads, clotted cream, soft goat or cow's milk cheese
Adapted from Anne Stone, my mother's recipe
Adapted from Anne Stone, my mother's recipe
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
The flavors of rose petal jelly are intoxicating and exotic; beautifully light and sweet, with the heady fragrance of a bouquet of fresh-cut roses. Perfect for a romantic morning breakfast or brunch. Get the recipe here!

 

“A rose by any other name would taste so sweet” quote,  William Shakespeare‘s play Romeo and Juliet

Rose Petal Jelly

Other jelly recipes to try:

Kumquat Jelly

Meyer Lemon Habanero Pepper Jelly




Spicy Cauliflower Pickles

SpicyCaulifPickles

 

 You can forget the food coloring when using these stunning, high-bred, cauliflower for pickling. High-bred varieties range from orange to dark purple, lending their vibrant color to the mix.

The orange cauliflower has higher than normal levels of beta carotene, a form of vitamin A that encourages a healthy skin. “These are the results of traditional selective breeding – where different strains have been cross-bred, and cross-bred, until these strains have been created. Source: UK Mail Online.

Perfect for making cauliflower pickles: high-bred varieties keep up their color, and crunch, for months after pickling. I recently opened a jar that was six months old, they were delicious and crisp as the day I pickled them…yum! 

SpicyCaulifPickle

 

This years pickle project uses the base from last years Hot Giardiniera mix (pictured above, for recipe click the photo) spicier, and a little sweeter, this years pickles pack a real punch. 

Last years Hot Giardiniera recipe is tart, spicy, and maintains the crisp texture of the vegetables for several months however, over time the vegetables tend to lose their natural color, leaving them a bit unappealing compared to store-bought, which contain additives, and color enhancers. 

When canning, I prefer to use as many natural ingredients as possible, allowing jams, and jellies to reduce to set, without the aid of pectin. I occasionally use pickling Lime but prefer to leave it out unless I’m making Lime Pickles 

Pickling lime for pickling cucumbers the old-fashioned way for extra crispness and flavor! Makes Cucumber Lime Pickles (recipe on each jar), Green Tomato Pickles, Watermelon Rinds and Citron Pickles. Pickling lime is food grade calcium hydroxide with no additives or preservatives. A quality pickling product from Mrs. Wages.

Choosing not to use pickling lime, or adding dye to the recipe, I opted to use the vibrantly colored hybrid, purple, and orange cauliflower.  I was pleasantly surprised to see their color held, despite the liquids purple tone. The orange cauliflower turned to a darker, red-orange, and the purple stayed, a deep purple color. 

On a side note: I tend to dig around the jar to evacuate the cauliflower pieces first,  as they are my favorite part of the mix. This years recipe is a spicier blend of seasonings, using only the cauliflower, forgoing the traditional celery and carrot. The result, less food remorse when tossing out the uneaten bits.

When the family has eaten up all the pickles, I save the pickle juice to use as a condiment for salmon balls or tuna fish cakes. I also use the leftover juices as a pickling brine for hard boiled eggs (purple pickled eggs), very yummy!

Pickling Spices

Delightfully colored, this is my new favorite pickle recipe, and the perfect accompaniment to my next post…Fried Chicken Livers.   By the way, they look amazing!

Purple and Yellow Cauliflower Pickles
Yields 6
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
40 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
40 min
Ingredients
  1. 9 cups white vinegar
  2. 6 cups water
  3. 1 tablespoon granulated sugar
  4. 2 teaspoon sea salt
  5. 3 large garlic cloves, slivered
  6. 2 teaspoon black whole peppercorns
  7. 7 small bay leaves
  8. 1 whole scotch bonnet pepper, sliced thinly
  9. 1 yellow or red sweet bell pepper sliced thinly
  10. 14 Thai hot chili peppers, whole
Instructions
  1. Prepare canning jars: wash in soap and water, rinse, and set into a large stock pot, pour enough water into the pot, enough to reach half to three quarters up the sides of jars, wash and rinse lids and rims. (for more info see manufactures instructions)
  2. Wash and break or cut cauliflower into small florets
  3. In a large stock pot, combine all ingredients, reserving the cauliflower until later
  4. Cook over medium high heat until just under a boil
  5. Add cauliflower florets and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently, do not reduce the heat
  6. Using a strainer or slotted ladle, quickly remove vegetables to a large bowl, set aside
  7. Using a clean pot holder, remove hot jars from boiling water, set on a clean dish towel,
  8. Fill jars with cooked cauliflower leaving 1/4 inch head space, distribute peppers, and spices evenly among jars
  9. Using a ladle, and funnel, pour hot liquid over vegetables, to cover
  10. Place rims and lids on jars, twist to tighten (do not over tighten lids at this point)
  11. Return the sealed jars to stock pot, and process filled jars for 15 minutes in boiling water
  12. Carefully remove jars from stock pot to a clean dish towel, rest until each has sealed. You will most likely hear "ping" or "Pop"
  13. Gently tighten the lids after 30 minutes
  14. Check seals after pickles have cooled, about 1 hour (it can take up to 24 hours for jars to seal) if the top pops "up" when pressed the jar is not sealed correctly, and should be reprocessed in the hot water bath or can be immediately refrigerated to consumption for up to 2 weeks.
Notes
  1. To avoid eating canned foods that have gone off and may be dangerous to your health, throw away jars that show warning signs. A convex lid means the container was not sealed properly; liquid leaking from the jar means it is possibly broken or was overstuffed; liquid spurting out of the jar when opened is a sign that your food may have started fermenting and is past its due date; and, when unnatural or off odors can be detected, it is time to toss your canned goods into the garbage.
  2. Clostridium Botulinum
  3. Most often found in improperly canned foods, the bacteria Clostridium botulinum produce a toxin that causes an illness affecting the nervous system called botulism. The bacteria is an anaerobic organism, which means it lives and grows in low oxygen conditions such as an improperly sealed can or jar.
  4. Read more: http://www.ehow.com/info_8461422_dangers-home-canning.html#ixzz2d6e0bUyr
Adapted from The Household Searchlight Recipe Book 1931 Edition
Adapted from The Household Searchlight Recipe Book 1931 Edition
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/

PurpleYellowCauliflower

PurpYellowCauliflower

Spicy Cauliflower Pickles

 

For detailed sterilization and canning instruction click HERE

 




Fresh Fig and Golden Tomato Chutney

 

Fig and Tomato Chutney

Fig and Tomato Chutney

FigTomChutney3edited

Sweet figs teamed with the savory sweet essence of fresh golden cherry tomatoes, accompanied by round notes of caramel from raw Agave nectar, a boost of cardamom, and ginger, a pinch of sea salt for good measure, polished by Grappa infused drunken currents; Fig and Golden Tomato Chutney, the consummation of all that is good and right with the world.  I love canning season!

Each year, I attempt to discover the pinnacle of flavors designing new recipes using fresh figs.  This years crop of figs was rich flavored, plump and perfect. Golden tomatoes were also in rare form, and so became the counter balance to the sublime, sweet flavor of the fresh Kalamata, Totato figs.  This recipe is truly a gem!

 

Fresh Golden Tomato

Fresh Golden Tomato

Kalamata Figs & Golden Cherry Tomato

Kalamata Figs & Golden Cherry Tomato

 

Fresh Fig and Golden Tomato Chutney
Yields 4
The perfect accompaniment to roasted lamb, pork or served with a creamy goat of cows milk cheese
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Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
45 min
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
45 min
Ingredients
  1. 6 cups quartered fresh figs, Kalamata, Totato or Mission
  2. 4 cups Golden Cherry Tomatoes
  3. 1 cup dried currants
  4. 1 cup Grappa
  5. 1 11.75 ounce bottle Agave Nectar
  6. 1 teaspoon ground cardamom
  7. 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  8. 1/8 teaspoon allspice
  9. 1/8 teaspoon sea salt
Instructions
  1. In a medium bowl, soak dried currants in 1 cup Grappa (vodka, Brizillaina Chacaha, Brandy)
  2. Gently rinse figs in cold water, cut in quarters, cut tomatoes in half, combine in a large stock pot
  3. Heat stock pot to medium high, stir in bottle of Agave Nectar, fill empty bottle with water and swish to get residue from sides of the bottle, add to stock pot
  4. stir to combine, add spices, and currants with remaining soaking liquid
  5. Cook for 20 minutes or until thick
  6. Pour hot chutney into prepared sterilized jars, seal with rims and lids, process in a hot water bath for 15 minutes
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/
 

Figs

Figs

Fig and Tomato Chutney

Fig and Tomato Chutney

See Sterilization and Jar Preparation for detailed canning instruction.

You might also like: The Anatomy of Jam

 
Fresh Kalamata Figs

 This recipe is being shared with The Spicy Foodie Your Best Recipe Roundup

 Your Best Recipes




Canning Fig Preserves

 Canning Fig Preserves
 
 

Figs, plump and naturally sweet are one of my favorite fruits to preserve.  I used Totato, Mission and Turkish figs this year and found the combination delivered a superbly flavored preserve with a round velvety texture.  I opted to forgo the pectin since figs are loaded with it naturally. 

Pectin is used in canning jams, jelly’s and preserves and acts as a thickening agent.  Mainly extracted from citrus fruits then reduced into powder form.  It can also be purchased in a condensed liquid form and used for canning in the same way as powder pectin.  I used less water in the recipe and reduced the mixture down by almost half, so there was no need to add pectin.

I’ve also been reading up on food photography and investing in a few items to help control the light, while reading my camera’s owners manual to get the best possible settings for the shot. I’ve found that I need a better lens to capture a crisper/sharper image, up close or in macro setting.  I’ll be saving my pennies while I begin my search for a higher quality camera and lens. In the meantime, I’ll be doing my best to take a higher quality photo with the camera I’m using.

Fig Preserves Recipe 
Makes 5-6, 8 ounce jars
prep time 35-40 minutes

 
8 cups whole fresh figs
2 teaspoon baking soda
2 1/4 cups granulated sugar
1 teaspoon minced ginger

zest from 1 lemon
3 tablespoons fresh squeezed lemon juice
3 cups hot tap water

Method 

  • Dissolve the baking soda in about 2 quarts hot tap water, and immerse the figs in the treated water in a large bowl. Gently stir to wash the figs, then drain off the water and rinse the figs thoroughly with fresh cool water.  
  • Slice figs in half, if you prefer a whole fruit preserve, skip this step
  • In a large stock or canning pot, combine figs, sugar, lemon juice, lemon zest, ginger and 1 cup hot tap water
  • bring to a boil stirring frequently, if using whole fruit gently stir in order not to break fruit
  • reduce heat and continue cooking until mixture is thick and gooey.  Watch closely in the last few minutes to keep bottom from burning
  • fill sterilized jars with hot preserves leaving 1/4 inch head space and cover with clean tops and rims
  • cook in a hot water bath for 15 minutes.  
  • Follow links for detailed canning instruction.

Open jars can be kept up to 3-4 weeks in the refrigerator.  Spread a generous helping of fig preserves over a crusty French bread and savor the flavor!

 





Canning Pepper Jelly

pepper jelly cream cheese

I’ve decided to share a few of my favorite recipe posts from the At Home with Rebecka Recipe Vault, while I’m vacationing with family in Philadelphia, New York and Washington DC next week. 

To begin the week…Pepper Jelly. 

Pepper Jelly is not only a great Christmas gift but a delicious summer treat. I find it difficult to stop eating this addictive snack, and crave the sweet hot flavors with a creamy block of Philadelphia Cream Cheese.  I’s that time of year so I think it’s time to head out the farmers market to buy a bunch of peppers!  Enjoy
 
Hot Pepper Jelly

When socializing during the Holidays or attending parties, and special events anytime of the year, I never arrive empty-handed. Popular hostess gifts such as a nice bottle of wine or fresh-cut flowers are a nice touch, but I try to take a different approach and make my gift a little more personal. I share a sweet jar of one of my homemade jellies, jams or chutney’s

The bright red color of the crisp peppers is deliciously inviting, so I choose red, orange and yellow sweet peppers for my Pepper Jelly recipe.

Tasting the combination of sweet, hot pepper jelly on a crisp Water Cracker brings back memories of Christmas’ long past and summer canning projects with my children.  Canning Pepper Jelly each year has become my signature Christmas gift for family and friends alike.

I also prefer my jelly very hot and add 3-4 Habanero peppers to the hot pepper mix. It’s easy to adjust the heat by using jalapeño instead. I generally use two or three different varieties to bring a fuller flavor to the recipe.

Recipe
4 to 6 red or green sweet peppers
6 to 10 hot peppers Habanero, jalapeño
6 cups sugar
1 1/3 cups white vinegar (5% acidity)
2 3-ounce packages liquid pectin
2-3 drops food red or green coloring (optional)

Method

  • Wash the peppers and remove seeds and ribs, and cut into chunks. Process each type of pepper in batches, in a food processor until coarsely ground.
  • Measure 1 cup ground sweet red pepper and 1/3 cup ground hot peppers.
  • Combine ground peppers, sugar, and vinegar in a large saucepan; bring to a boil.
  • Boil 6 minutes stirring frequently.
  • Stir in pectin and boil 3 minutes, stir frequently.
  • Remove from heat and skim off foam.
  • Pour hot jelly into hot sterilized jars, leaving ¼ inch. Wipe jar rims with clean damp cloth. Cover with metal lids and screw on bands; Process in water bath for 5-10 minutes. Makes 6 half pints.

My recipe has been adapted throughout the years but it’s origins are founded in the Household Search Light Recipe Book and Fannie Flagg’s Whistle Stop Cafe Cookbook.

Pictured: Recipe Extra Hot Habanero Pepper Jelly
Click photo for recipe

You might also like to readMount Vesuvius Erupts in my kitchen .  A tale of canning gone wrong, with a happy ending!

 




Habanero Pepper Jelly

pepper jelly nails
 
Canning Pepper Jelly each Spring has become an annual event and the fruits of my labour my signature Christmas gift for family and friends alike. I try to add something new each year to keep everyone interested so my Pepper Jelly is always the crowd favorite.
 
When socializing during the holidays or attending social gatherings or special events, I never arrive empty-handed. Popular hostess gifts such as a nice bottle of wine or fresh-cut flowers are a nice touch, but I try to take a different approach and make my gift a little more personal. I share a sweet jar of  homemade Hot Pepper Jelly.
 
Last years Pepper Jelly canning day, ended in near catastrophe, leading to my post Mount Vesuvius Erupts in my Kitchen!  Thankfully, this years canning day went much smoother. 
 
After receiving a call this week from my oldest daughter Tanya, I knew it was time to teach her how to make Pepper Jelly in her kitchen.  You see, she craves the stuff and was inquiring if I had any jars left from last years batch.  Sadly, I had to break the news that all the jars had been given away as gifts during the holidays, resulting in last nights canning festivities.  Tanya was my student, as I shared the technic for canning Pepper Jelly.  Very pleased with her efforts, she left with six jars of the sweet, hot jelly.  Our trade, newly polished nails for St. Patrick’s Day.  Too cute!!
 
 
 
I like the bright red color of red peppers for the Holiday season so I generally choose red, orange and yellow sweet peppers for my recipe. I prefer my jelly very hot and add 3-4 Habanero peppers to the hot pepper mix. This year we went even hotter, adding 1 whole cup of ground Habanero.  It’s easy to adjust the heat by using jalapeno instead but there’s something tantalizing about the powerful Habanero in this recipe. 
 
 
Recipe:
 
1 cup ground red, orange and yellow sweet peppers
1 cup ground Habanero peppers
12 cups sugar
2 cups white vinegar (5% acidity)
4 3-ounce packages liquid pectin
 
Optional: 2-3 drops food red or green coloring
 
12 half pint canning jars, lids and rims
 
Method:
  • Wash the peppers and remove seeds and ribs, and cut into chunks.
  • Process each type of pepper, in batches, in a food processor until coarsely ground. Use rubber gloves when working with Habanero and jalapeno.
  • Combine ground peppers, sugar, and vinegar in a large saucepan; bring to a boil.
  • Boil 6 minutes stirring frequently. During the boiling process it’s imperative you stand by and watch the hot liquid as it has a tendency to flow over. You do not want an eruption of hot liquid in your kitchen.
  • Stir in pectin and boil 3 minutes, stir frequently.
  • Remove from heat and skim off foam.
  • Pour hot jelly into hot sterilized jars, leaving ¼ inch head space.
  • Wipe jar rims with clean damp cloth.
  • Cover with metal lids and screw on bands; Process in hot water bath for 15 minutes. Makes 12 half pints.
Hot Water Bath: in a large stock pot add enough water to submerge filled sealed jars, boil filled jars on medium high heat for 10-15 minutes, remove to a dry towel. Jars will make a distinctive “ping” sound when they’ve sealed correctly. 
 
 Serve on crackers with a smear of cream cheese.
 
 
You might also like reading my post, the Anatomy of Jam