Habanero Honey Peanut Brittle

 
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I drew my inspiration for this recipe from one of my favorite food bloggers, girlichef!   Her recipe for Habanero Honey looked so amazing and I love spicy foods so, the logical course of action was to make some for my kitchen pantry!  My only problem was thinking of how to use the darn stuff after making it.  You see…it could peel the paint off the walls!! 

Just a whiff from the jar and I could feel the heat from the chili in my throat!  It looked so inviting and without hesitation, I stuck my finger in the jar for a little taste!!  Holy Crap!! I got some really spicy stuff in that jar!!   Thank God, I didn’t stick my finger in my eye after I licked it!!

After a few moments and a few tissues, I recovered.  I love spicy foods, the kind that bring that “burn so good” feeling to your mouth!  This honey certainly did the trick, it’s just a little too spicy by itself. 

My husband loves peanut brittle so I made my first batch two nights ago and just about cooked it to death….as you’ll see in the picture below.  However, it got me thinking about girlichef’s Habanero Honey and how tasty it might be added to the peanut brittle. 

Lord in the Heavens!! It’s the best peanut brittle I’ve ever made or tasted…don’t mind me while I toot my horn!  The famous combination of sweet and salty with the blazing hot chili was smashing!!

You can substitute Scotch Bonnet Peppers…which to me, are almost the same thing as Habanero but grown in different regions, honestly, I can’t tell the difference. Side
 
 
Notes: Test for thermometer inaccuracies:
 
To test your candy thermometer, place in a saucepan full of tap water, at sea level it should reach 212 degrees F. at the hard boil stage. If it reads above or below the number make adjustments in your cooking times. Most recipes are based on sea level measure. For higher altitudes subtract 1 degree F. for every listed temperature for each 500 feet above sea level.For the cold water test; before adding the peanuts, and after the thermometer reads 310 F. place a few drops of hot liquid in a cup of ice-cold water, wait a few seconds, the candy should hard and crack when broken. Be careful not to burn your fingers when testing the hot liquid.
 
 

Recipe Habanero Peanut Brittle
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For the Brittle
  1. 1 cup raw peanuts
  2. 1/2 cup sugar
  3. 1/2 cup Karo Syrup
  4. 1/4 cup water
  5. 1/4 cup Habanero Honey (recipe below)
  6. 1 tablespoon salted butter
  7. 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  8. 1 candy thermometer
  9. Prepare a non stick cookie sheet with butter or vegetable spray, set aside
Recipe Habanero Honey
  1. 10-12 Habanero peppers
  2. 2-3 Cups Honey
  3. Pretty jar with an air tight cover
  4. Gloves
Instructions
  1. In a medium saucepan on medium heat, mix sugar, Karo syrup, water and Habanero Honey together until just blended, place the candy thermometer into the saucepan and bring mixture to a rolling boil.
  2. Don't stir the mixture! It will take 25-30 minutes to reach the hard crack stage or 302-310 degrees F. on the candy thermometer.
  3. When the candy thermometer reads 250 degrees or soft ball stage
  4. 1. add the peanuts,
  5. 2. cook until the thermometer reaches 302 - 310 F degrees or hard crack stage,
  6. 3. remove from heat,
  7. 4. add butter and stir to blend,
  8. add baking soda.
  9. Remember to use a wooden spoon to stir the hot syrup or you'll melt your spatula like I did !  Duh!
  10. The baking soda will make the mixture froth and double in size, stir for about 30 seconds then...
  11. Pour the syrup out onto a prepared baking sheet, spread into a thin layer and allow to cool at room temperature for 30 minutes, break the hardened brittle into pieces,  store in an airtight container.
Directions For the Habanero Honey
  1. Thinly slice the Habanero and place in the jar, pour honey over to cover the chilies and let them steep at room temperature. The chilies will expel their juice and oils so you must stir the mix a few times during the steeping process. Mixture ripens over time however, can be used immediately.
  2. Honey is a natural preservative and will keep the chilies preserved at room temperature indefinitely.
Notes
  1. The last few minutes are crucial when making brittle. (300 degrees F to 310 F.) It's best to stay with the hot liquid watching carefully not to burn the mixture. Sometimes wet weather can play a role in candy making, as well as rapid barometric pressure change. The science of candy making can get real tricky. The best way to get the desired hard crack is to make the recipe several times allowing for more cooking time, and do a cold water test. Most of all…don't get discouraged if your brittle doesn't turn out the first time.
At Home with Rebecka http://athomewithrebecka.com/

 

 

habenero honey peanut brittle before cooking

 

habenero honey boiling

 

habenero peanut brittle wsoda

 

habenero honey peanut brittle on baking sheet

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Here’s a photo of my “almost burnt peanut brittle” from my first batch…the over cooked, darker brittle is the one in back…it was still tasty but I prefer the  taste of brittle that has less color.  Luckily, my husband likes it either way and the first batch will not go to waste!

I was very pleased with the spicy, sweet peanut brittle! However,  I ate more than I should and had a raging sugar high for a few hours.
 
Another Habanero Honey recipe I’d like to try is, pan seared scallops in garlic brown butter and Habanero honey drizzled over…yum!  Or maybe I’ll just pour the honey over a brick of cream cheese and eat it with crackers.  
 
Check out girl chef’s recipe for homemade Mizithra cheese and crackers with her Habanero Honey!  It’s a must have for any kitchen pantry!!

 

 

 

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    • Hi Beck,

      The most likely reason the brittle turned out more like taffy is that it needed to be cooked a few more minutes to reach the hard crack stage. The last few minutes are crucial when making brittle. (300 degrees F to 310 F.) Sometimes wet weather can play a role in candy making as well as rapid barometric pressure change, forcing you to add more cooking time. The science of candy making can get real tricky.

      Other causes: thermometer inaccuracies

      To test your candy thermometer, place in a saucepan full of tap water, at sea level it should reach 212 degrees F. at the hard boil stage. If it reads above or below the number make adjustments in your cooking times. Most recipes are based on sea level measure. For higher altitudes subtract 1 degree F. for every listed temperature for each 500 feet above sea level.

      The best way to get the desired hard crack is to make the recipe a few more times allowing for more cooking time, and do a cold water test.

      For the cold water test; prior to adding the peanuts, and after the thermometer reads 310 F. place a few drops of hot liquid in a cup of ice cold water, wait a few seconds, the candy should hard and crack when broken. Be careful not to burn your fingers when testing the hot liquid.

      Most of all…don’t get discouraged!

      I just failed miserably making candy for 700 people. I tried to triple the recipe to save time…bad idea. Too much volume caused the liquid to heat slower, the mixture began to caramelize so when I added the blue food coloring to make ice blue candy, it turned green! UGH! I was so frustrated! I know better than to double or triple candy recipes.

      Let me know how the next batch turns out! BTW, I’m happy that at least the first batch tasted yummy!!

  1. What is an easy way to get honey out the jar once it has steeped? without getting pieces of tabanero mixed in?thank Clarence

    • Hi Clarence, The peppers tend to float to the bottom of the jar so I’ve never really had an issue with chunks however, you could use a regular honey spoon (the wooden kind with round bulb on the end) or just use a regular spoon to dish out a bit. I generally stick my finger in for a quick taste but rinse right away so I don’t get the hot oil in my eyes. I also think that if you get a few little pieces of pepper flesh got past you the heat from the caramel would probably cook them to death. Thanks for visiting. Let me know how how you like the recipe!

    • Hi Jim I generally allow the peppers to soak for up to a week before using but 24 hours is ample time to impart great flavor. I use 5-8 peppers for one batch, about 3 cups of honey.i’ve kept a jar at room temp for over 6 months mighty powerful at that point but still delicious. Let me know how it goes

  2. Hi Perry, I moved my RSS subscribe widget up closer to the top of my blog. You'll find it right under the Foodie Blogroll Winner Badge. I have it set so you can subscribe in several different readers. Let me know if you have any trouble!

  3. Rebecka…this would likely kill me, but it sure looks like a good way to go, lol!Hey, do you have a RSS feed here on your blog? I'd like to add you to my reader, but I couldn't find it.Thanks!-Perry

  4. mangocheeks, I would love your jelly!! All my favorite things mixed into one jar…YUM!Anette, You're right, the flavor is very exotic! If you like spicy foods you'd love this honey! I just suggest you use it with other foods to help calm the fire! xoxo

  5. Hi Pam!! How's you neck of the woods?? It's snowing a bit up here and the wind is howling. Maybe we'll get a few inches of snow tonight! I hope you try making this brittle. It's really something different for the Holiday's. I tried it on some Greek yogurt today an it was to die for…it's become my newest food obsession!! Like I need another one!!Gloria, I don't refrigerate my honey. After doing some research about the subject I found that honey acts as a natural preservative. Just make sure to store it out of direct sunlight. I read a very informative article about the natural antibacterial nature of honey…check out this link for more info: http://www.entrepreneur.com/tradejournals/article/132772675.html

  6. Gloria, you're so lucky to grow your own habanero plants. I live so high in the mountains that almost nothing grows up here. I'm forced to purchase all my produce and after years of having my own garden that makes me a little sad! I make lot's of recipes with habaneros too. Peach Salsa and Pepper jelly are two of my favorites! xoBiren, If you like spicy, sweet foods you'll love this peanut brittle! I've eaten so much of the first batch that I'm sure to pop! It has the same allure as the honey… once you get a taste you just can't stop!

  7. That's one fiery and fierce peanut brittle! I am a big fan of peanut brittle but have never made it. Perhaps I should make this fiery version for the holidays.

  8. Hi Rebecka. I do make Habanero jam/jelly. I love it! We grow our own habaneros so we always have tons. I freeze it or dry it in the dehydrator. I took one out of the freezer this morning to eat with my scrambled egg. Now I'm getting tempted to make this but I'm not. I may just make some jam. 🙂 Thanks, it looks so good. Enjoy and I love Heather and her blog too.

  9. Rebecka…I'm laughing so hard over here…because that honey is just so alluring! I continued to stick my finger in for a dip after blowing my head off the last time—-over and over again, LOL!! I'm glad that you liked it and I LOVE the idea of using in a fiery brittle…YUM! It's fantastic w/ pork, too…blogging that soon. Thanks so much for sharing the love 😀